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In January, Your Wardrobe Unlock'dTM featured an article about personal "Holy Grails", meaning costumes that you desperately want but are impossibly out-of-reach due to time, money, experience, extravagance, whatever. So I find myself wondering, what are my Holy Grails?

I’m Sunny Buchler – I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, which is a bit of a mecca for historical costuming, and moved to Cleveland, Ohio a couple years ago.

 

 

Tags: Interviews

ImageThis month, Kendra van Cleave answers your questions about making costumes the old-fashioned way, discusses making historical styles work on every size of woman, and enthuses about her personal favourite costume movies!

icon free smAren’t sure what type of fabric to use for period costume? Diana steers you toward more convincing, historically accurate fabrics.

icon free smMore historically accurate than Disney, yet quick, easy and inexpensive, with separate pieces that can begin a mix-and-match costume collection.

Bjarne Drews

Danish embroiderer and costume maker Bjarne Drews has a magnificent obsession with the costume and embellishment of the eighteenth century European royal courts. Your Wardrobe Unlock'd caught up with him in Copenhagen to talk about what it is that fascinates him, how he got started and how you can get started too in the intricate art of hand embroidery.

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Hi. My name is Vicky Clarke, and I'm a writer, housewife, bellydancer, and general creative rebel. I live in Cambridge, UK, along with my partner and a quite ridiculous collection of craft materials.

My interest in home-made clothes began in my childhood; growing up in the late 70s it was the handmade clothes I wore (along with mustard-brown Denby crockery and nasty, nasty wallpaper) that formed the backdrop of my daily life.

Tags: Interviews

ImageThis month, Sarah Lorraine answers your questions about historical accuracy, matching patterns and the delicate art of wig-making...

 

 

 

 

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My grandmother had her own atelier where she made fur coats after World War II until they went out of fashion. My mother is a costumer and has studied arts. I studied Graphic Design & Mediation and always loved crafts.


I did not start sewing until after my divorce, when I had to sell my horses I suddenly had time and a desire to do something new and for myself. I used to help my mother with basting and cutting of clothes to make, but never actually used a sewing machine.

I only started in 2004, I made most improvement by one simple rule, sew everyday for at least one hour. First it's to make progress, next it's to maintain your level.

ImageEnglishwoman Michelle Pye has an extraordinary breadth of experience within sewing. She is an accomplished tailoress, dressmaker, teacher and retailer of fine interlinings.

 

 

 

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