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1880s Bustle Dress Study

Squarebodice10Museums are full of inspiring, elaborate dresses. But what about more everyday dresses? Katherine gives us an up-close view of a very make-able dress.

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plumetis  
  Thank you Katherine!

Which beautiful descriptive work... For what I waited for a long time
 
 
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koshkathecat  
  Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it :)  
 
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koshkathecat  
  Thank you! I'm so glad you enjoyed it :)  
 
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urbanseamstress  
  This is marvellous!

Love love love the fabric -- so simple-looking at first glance yet so whimsical upon further inspection! -- and the dress itself is just fascinating as it gives such lovely insight in everyday (sewing) practice :)

Did I already mention I just love that fabric? ;)
 
 
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koshkathecat  
  Ha! Maybe you did!

I have it on Spoonflower--it's just not public yet!
 
 
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trinnyt  
  Thank you so much! I claim vindication on two things, not lining my sleeves, and pinning my skirt closed.. The sleeves because it's (a) quicker, but (b) also because it's cooler in the Australian weather.. :)  
 
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koshkathecat  
  I looked very hard, but especially with the pin there, I do think no closures! Vindication is good :)

And living in a hot climate, I'm totally with you on unlined sleeves!
 
 
valarie  
  I love learning from extant clothing in my hands, and just recently wrote about two of them in my blog.
Right now I'm working on a bodice with a similar peplum as this and now I see how the pleats are supposed to work. Thank you!
I also don't line my sleeves so I'm glad to see that.
Do you know why there was the round addition to the underarm? Size extension?
 
 
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koshkathecat  
  Originals are the best!

I'm not sure what you mean by round addition. The bodice doesn't appear to have been altered.
 
 
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valarie  
  I should have copied what you said alongside the photo.
"The bodice has a loop of self fabric sewn to the left underarm. This loop is sewn to the seam allowances by hand, and was made by folding a strip of fabric with the seam allowances folded in and using a few large overcast stitches to hold it closed."
 
 

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