Log in

Log in

My Account    |    Sign Up!



HomeIndex of ArticlesHistorical periodsVictorian & EdwardianEarly-Mid Victorian 1837-67Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler

Victorian & Edwardian

Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler

Ivory silk bodiceI've often been frustrated that there are wonderful Victorian patterns available (published in the period or drafted from extant dresses) but there is very little information on how to put the pieces together or on the other finishing details that go into making historical dress.

Here I'll address this gap by doing a photographic analysis of the construction techniques used in three Victorian evening bodices in my personal collection.

Due to the Single Pattern Project, I'm most interested in the elliptical style. Two of the bodices were either worn with elliptical skirts or with the early bustle style, the third was probably worn with the earlier circular hoop style.

Register to read more...
Gravatar
zipzip  
Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler   In the two bodices in which the lining pieces do not match the fashion fabric pieces, in what order was the construction done, do you suppose?
Do you think that
1) the fashion fabric pieces were laid together as they would look when finished (complete with fake piping effect),
2)then pinned and/or basted,
3)and then the pieces were flipped over to the wrong side,
4) and the lining laid on top and pinned and/or basted to hold it to the fashion fabric,
5) and then the backstiching made through all layers?
This would mean that one line of stitching held everything together. Are there pinholes to help tell the story?

I cannot see how else it could have been done given the type of seam illustrated in the drawing at top, which, by the by, looks like the lapped seams so common on earlier garments.

Any light to shed on this matter?

Thanks kindly,
Natalie in Kentucky
 
 
Gravatar
sunshinebuchler  
Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler   No pinholes that I could see. But remember, hand sewing requires a lot fewer pins then machine sewing does - you're going slower and your hands will hold it in position even better then pins will. I think the backs were done in one of two ways:

1) The center back section was aligned onto the center of the back lining, then the side back sections were sewn onto both the center back and the lining, by top-stitching along the curved line though all layers (with the seam allowance folded under).

OR
 
 
Gravatar
sunshinebuchler  
Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler   (continued...)

2) The side back pieces were sewn to the center back piece, then all were attached to the back lining, and then top-stitched along the side-back seams was then done though all the layers.

I lean towards the first explanation, as I think it would be much easier to do. Plus, given the lining is in one piece, having only one line of stitching joining the back and the side back pieces isn't structurally a problem. Unfortunately the only way to be sure is to take the back pieces apart...

Hope that helps!
-sunny
 
 
Gravatar
zipzip  
Analyzing the Construction of Three Victorian Evening Bodices by Sunny Buchler   Dear Sunny,
It does help: thank you!
Natalie in Kentucky
 
 
Gravatar
plumetis  
  Thank you Sunny!
A really very interesting report.
 
 

1000 Characters left


Go to top